Raymond E. Bourey, MD, FACP, FACE, FAASM

Raymond E. Bourey, MD, FACP, FACE, FAASM Raymond E. Bourey, MD, FACP, FACE, FAASM
Associate Professor  Clinical Educator of Internal Medicine
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Department of Internal Medicine
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism
Saint Louis University School of Medicine

Medical School:

Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

Springfield, IL

June 1982

 

Internship:

The Miriam Hospital/Brown University

Providence, RI

July 1983

 

Residency:

Southern Illiniois University School of Medicine

Springfield, IL

July 1986

 

Fellowship:

Washington University

St. Louis, MO

June 1990

 

Board Certification:

Endocriology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Internal Medicine

Sleep Medicine

Sports Medicine

Forensic Medicine

 

Special Clinical Interests:

Menopausal Insomnia

Dr. Bourey joined the faculty at St. Louis University School of Medicine in July 2014.

Dr. Bourey’s work has been guided by the aspiration to help men and women maximize their functional capacity – that is, their ability to physically, mentally and emotionally accomplish their goals.

After early contributions to understanding of exercise, muscle glucose metabolism and aging, Dr. Bourey has turned to focus on neuroendocrine control of sleep, appetite, and metabolism.

Dr. Bourey identified a connection between poor sleep and high morning blood sugars in patients with diabetes. He subsequently undertook additional training and study in sleep medicine, which he felt, as an endocrinologist and exercise physiologist, represented a "back door” to study of metabolic control by brain and central nervous system.

Dr. Bourey’s clinical research currently centers on deleterious effects of menopause on sleep and metabolism. Menopause can be surgical, medication-induced (chemotherapy), or a natural consequence of aging. Menopause is associated with disruption of sleep and features of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. Evidence supports a direct metabolic relationship between sleep disruption and development of the metabolic syndrome.


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